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Helpful ReplyAm I ok going with a simulated sine wave UPS?

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EllBrad
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2017/02/17 14:20:33 (permalink)
Or does EVGA only recommend pure sine wave with line interactive with their PSUs because of power factor correction?

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Tech_RayH
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Re: Am I ok going with a simulated sine wave UPS? 2017/02/17 14:24:22 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby EllBrad 2017/02/18 12:41:42
The power supplies all have active PFC and can support a simulated sine wave from an APC just fine

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EVGATech_LeeM
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Re: Am I ok going with a simulated sine wave UPS? 2017/02/17 14:28:07 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby EllBrad 2017/02/18 12:41:45
Do EVGA Power Supplies support UPS backup devices that support Line-Interactive AVR UPS which uses a simulated/artificial sine wave?
 
Edit:  To clarify the FAQ a bit, the main source of potential harm from Active-PFC and UPS devices comes from the rush of power that spikes when the UPC flips from the wall outlet to the backup.  If the UPS device has a large fluctuation outside of what the PSU's Active-PFC can handle, then you might see some damage.  However, all of EVGA's Active-PFC power supplies are well-within the margins to tolerate these kinds of voltage fluctuations.  I'd generally recommend purchasing a good quality brand and unit, however, to make sure those sorts of issues have a low probability of occurring.  
post edited by EVGATech_LeeM - 2017/02/17 14:35:31
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Re: Am I ok going with a simulated sine wave UPS? 2017/02/18 04:26:33 (permalink)
At least someone able to get answer from evga, they ignored my question about this same thing.
 
http://forums.evga.com/UPS-backup-power-m2614025.aspx
 
 

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Re: Am I ok going with a simulated sine wave UPS? 2017/02/18 10:01:51 (permalink)
Nice Info and Link EVGATech_LeeM

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Re: Am I ok going with a simulated sine wave UPS? 2017/02/18 11:22:29 (permalink)
EVGATech_LeeM
Do EVGA Power Supplies support UPS backup devices that support Line-Interactive AVR UPS which uses a simulated/artificial sine wave?
 
Edit:  To clarify the FAQ a bit, the main source of potential harm from Active-PFC and UPS devices comes from the rush of power that spikes when the UPC flips from the wall outlet to the backup.  If the UPS device has a large fluctuation outside of what the PSU's Active-PFC can handle, then you might see some damage.  However, all of EVGA's Active-PFC power supplies are well-within the margins to tolerate these kinds of voltage fluctuations.  I'd generally recommend purchasing a good quality brand and unit, however, to make sure those sorts of issues have a low probability of occurring.  


EVGATech_LeeM is correct that the main source of potential harm is from power spikes. Having a good battery backup is essential in saving your computer from possible damage from these large fluctuations or spikes from the power source.
There is however another condition that occurs and can be unseen and cause severe damage to Hard Drives. That condition would be a Brown Out where the power going to your computer from a 110 volt power source is less than say 99 volts. Your computer will still work but the life of your hard drives is significantly decreased. There are volumes of information regarding this topic.The best solution to stop a Brown Out would be to purchase a good battery backup that is line interactive. The cheap UPSs only turn on if there is a blackout, total loss of power and offer protection from spikes. The pure sine UPS will be the most expensive, but if you get one that is line interactive you will prevent the small drop in power to your computer and extend the life of your hard drives.
 
Thanks for the post EVGATech_LeeM


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EllBrad
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Re: Am I ok going with a simulated sine wave UPS? 2017/02/18 17:04:15 (permalink)
Because it's a SSW and a standby unit, means no brownout protection? This one I bought CyberPower EC650LCD manual claims it will switch to battery in event of a brownout

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Re: Am I ok going with a simulated sine wave UPS? 2017/02/18 23:52:42 (permalink)
EllBrad
Because it's a SSW and a standby unit, means no brownout protection? This one I bought CyberPower EC650LCD manual claims it will switch to battery in event of a brownout


Then you should be fine. There a plenty out there that kick in when there is a power loss, but do not constantly monitor the current. If the model you have monitors the power and assists if you have a lower current then you should be fine. Many models merely turn on where there is a power loss!


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Re: Am I ok going with a simulated sine wave UPS? 2017/02/22 13:01:48 (permalink)
EllBrad
Because it's a SSW and a standby unit, means no brownout protection? This one I bought CyberPower EC650LCD manual claims it will switch to battery in event of a brownout


If that is on the system that is in your sig, it's too small. Its max rated output is 390 watts. Your UPS should be sized, at the bare minimum, at your expected max power draw.

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EllBrad
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Re: Am I ok going with a simulated sine wave UPS? 2017/02/22 13:07:06 (permalink)
HeavyHemi
EllBrad
Because it's a SSW and a standby unit, means no brownout protection? This one I bought CyberPower EC650LCD manual claims it will switch to battery in event of a brownout


If that is on the system that is in your sig, it's too small. Its max rated output is 390 watts. Your UPS should be sized, at the bare minimum, at your expected max power draw.




I've tested my system using a kill-a-watt and it did not draw more than 320 watts running fire strike

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HeavyHemi
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Re: Am I ok going with a simulated sine wave UPS? 2017/02/22 13:40:41 (permalink)
EllBrad
HeavyHemi
EllBrad
Because it's a SSW and a standby unit, means no brownout protection? This one I bought CyberPower EC650LCD manual claims it will switch to battery in event of a brownout


If that is on the system that is in your sig, it's too small. Its max rated output is 390 watts. Your UPS should be sized, at the bare minimum, at your expected max power draw.




I've tested my system using a kill-a-watt and it did not draw more than 320 watts running fire strike


Okay, but I don't know why you would use a UPS sized smaller than your PSU. In any event, as long as you have it set up to shut down your system automatically it will work as a large surge protector.  Otherwise you'll only have a couple minutes to shut your system down until the UPS kicks off. In a year or so as your battery ages that time will be cut down to almost nothing. I live way out in the boonies so power glitches are pretty frequent. I'm running a CyberPower 2200va...The quiet hum and 70 pounds is reassuring
post edited by HeavyHemi - 2017/02/22 13:44:40

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Re: Am I ok going with a simulated sine wave UPS? 2017/02/22 14:07:50 (permalink)
HeavyHemi
EllBrad
HeavyHemi
EllBrad
Because it's a SSW and a standby unit, means no brownout protection? This one I bought CyberPower EC650LCD manual claims it will switch to battery in event of a brownout


If that is on the system that is in your sig, it's too small. Its max rated output is 390 watts. Your UPS should be sized, at the bare minimum, at your expected max power draw.




I've tested my system using a kill-a-watt and it did not draw more than 320 watts running fire strike


Okay, but I don't know why you would use a UPS sized smaller than your PSU. In any event, as long as you have it set up to shut down your system automatically it will work as a large surge protector.  Otherwise you'll only have a couple minutes to shut your system down until the UPS kicks off. In a year or so as your battery ages that time will be cut down to almost nothing. I live way out in the boonies so power glitches are pretty frequent. I'm running a CyberPower 2200va...The quiet hum and 70 pounds is reassuring


I have seen some really nice UPSs that have software and connect to your system. Once it detects a power failure after a selected amount of time it will properly shut your system down. I think APC had one called 'Powerchute'. HeavyHemi will have plenty of time with a 2200va.


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HeavyHemi
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Re: Am I ok going with a simulated sine wave UPS? 2017/02/22 14:20:41 (permalink)
robbysites
HeavyHemi
EllBrad
HeavyHemi
EllBrad
Because it's a SSW and a standby unit, means no brownout protection? This one I bought CyberPower EC650LCD manual claims it will switch to battery in event of a brownout


If that is on the system that is in your sig, it's too small. Its max rated output is 390 watts. Your UPS should be sized, at the bare minimum, at your expected max power draw.




I've tested my system using a kill-a-watt and it did not draw more than 320 watts running fire strike


Okay, but I don't know why you would use a UPS sized smaller than your PSU. In any event, as long as you have it set up to shut down your system automatically it will work as a large surge protector.  Otherwise you'll only have a couple minutes to shut your system down until the UPS kicks off. In a year or so as your battery ages that time will be cut down to almost nothing. I live way out in the boonies so power glitches are pretty frequent. I'm running a CyberPower 2200va...The quiet hum and 70 pounds is reassuring


I have seen some really nice UPSs that have software and connect to your system. Once it detects a power failure after a selected amount of time it will properly shut your system down. I think APC had one called 'Powerchute'. HeavyHemi will have plenty of time with a 2200va.





His is capable of that. I'm not suggesting he needs one that large. I used to run SLI TITAN's with a GTX 580 for PhysX. When I was folding, including on the CPU, I had no problems pulling 1KW from the outlet. He can use Power Panel Business edition or Power Panel Personal Edition and a USB port.

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EllBrad
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Re: Am I ok going with a simulated sine wave UPS? 2017/02/22 14:23:30 (permalink)
HeavyHemi
. I live way out in the boonies so power glitches are pretty frequent. I'm running a CyberPower 2200va...The quiet hum and 70 pounds is reassuring




That's a beauty I live in a smallish town and experience maybe 5 power outages per year but never seen a brown out.
 
robbysites
I have seen some really nice UPSs that have software and connect to your system. Once it detects a power failure after a selected amount of time it will properly shut your system down. I think APC had one called 'Powerchute'. HeavyHemi will have plenty of time with a 2200va.




 
CyberPower has "Powerpanel" that does feature current sensing and auto-shutdown that can be set for when battery reaches a certain percentage.

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Re: Am I ok going with a simulated sine wave UPS? 2017/03/06 16:34:40 (permalink)
So, would this one be ok with my 850 G3? :) 
 
https://www.amazon.com/gp...amp;smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER
post edited by hakkinen - 2017/03/06 16:36:46



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Re: Am I ok going with a simulated sine wave UPS? 2017/03/07 07:17:57 (permalink)
hakkinen
So, would this one be ok with my 850 G3? :) 
 
https://www.amazon.com/gp...amp;smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER


I like it. It has protection for everything that runs through my computer room. It even has a NEMA rating. I did not look at the warranty but it does have a pure sine - Good name brand. I have several here at work.

 
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Fill out the info when you get it and the only thing you will have to do is replace the battery in a few years.
post edited by robbysites - 2017/03/07 07:20:00


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