2021/03/29 04:24:25
B0baganoosh
I was just curious if anyone could tell me EVGA's normal timing for putting out QVLs for memory on a new motherboard launch. Is this something I shouldn't really worry about and just try to get the best kit ahead of time? (there's a 10% off sale on Newegg today lol). I was just thinking that if they launched it and didn't release a QVL at launch, I'd just have to take a shot anyway. Seems like going for the best 2x16GB kit of G.Skill b-die I can find should be fine maybe? Specifically looking at F4-4000C16D-32GTZR if anybody wants to weigh in. Thanks.
2021/03/29 07:04:54
rblaes_99
I'm eyeballing the same ram kit.  those or the royals.  
2021/03/29 09:24:42
B0baganoosh
From Jacob:

https://twitter.com/EVGA_...76568308695101440?s=19

"You should be fine with those :) Actually going forward the QVL memory lists will be retired, no real known compatibility issues with memory that falls under spec."
2021/03/29 10:38:40
EVGATech_LeeM
We usually publish a QVL when the product goes in-stock or shortly thereafter.  Generally speaking, the only place I would expect to see any compatibility issues is on the extreme high-side of the memory overclocking limit, which would be normal for every board.
2021/03/29 11:49:05
ty_ger07
Nike_7688
"You should be fine with those :) Actually going forward the QVL memory lists will be retired, no real known compatibility issues with memory that falls under spec."

That's a pretty lazy approach. The purpose of QVL is to verify that the memory works and so that the motherboard manufacturer has a chance to work with the memory and optimize the board's sub-timings. If the QVL is retired, memory compatibility could suffer and memory performance could suffer.
2021/03/29 12:16:24
B0baganoosh
ty_ger07
Nike_7688
"You should be fine with those :) Actually going forward the QVL memory lists will be retired, no real known compatibility issues with memory that falls under spec."

That's a pretty lazy approach. The purpose of QVL is to verify that the memory works and so that the motherboard manufacturer has a chance to work with the memory and optimize the board's sub-timings. If the QVL is retired, memory compatibility could suffer and memory performance could suffer.



It depends on how they do it, really.
 
For example, if you look at the z490, it says "Memory Support – 2 DIMM Dual-Channel (up to 64GB) DDR4 4800MHz+" on the specs. If they did a good enough job testing all sorts of memory up to that point and everything works great, than I don't see an issue with it. If there are 25 kits in the world that run 4800MHz and only 1 of them is compatible...yeah...no good. I think the execution is the important part and we can only wait to see how that goes.
2021/03/29 14:11:36
ty_ger07
Nike_7688
ty_ger07
Nike_7688
"You should be fine with those :) Actually going forward the QVL memory lists will be retired, no real known compatibility issues with memory that falls under spec."

That's a pretty lazy approach. The purpose of QVL is to verify that the memory works and so that the motherboard manufacturer has a chance to work with the memory and optimize the board's sub-timings. If the QVL is retired, memory compatibility could suffer and memory performance could suffer.



It depends on how they do it, really.
 
For example, if you look at the z490, it says "Memory Support – 2 DIMM Dual-Channel (up to 64GB) DDR4 4800MHz+" on the specs. If they did a good enough job testing all sorts of memory up to that point and everything works great, than I don't see an issue with it. If there are 25 kits in the world that run 4800MHz and only 1 of them is compatible...yeah...no good. I think the execution is the important part and we can only wait to see how that goes.


What does that have to do with testing, validating, and optimizing board sub-timings?
2021/03/29 14:56:56
HeavyHemi
Nike_7688
ty_ger07
Nike_7688
"You should be fine with those :) Actually going forward the QVL memory lists will be retired, no real known compatibility issues with memory that falls under spec."

That's a pretty lazy approach. The purpose of QVL is to verify that the memory works and so that the motherboard manufacturer has a chance to work with the memory and optimize the board's sub-timings. If the QVL is retired, memory compatibility could suffer and memory performance could suffer.



It depends on how they do it, really.
 
For example, if you look at the z490, it says "Memory Support – 2 DIMM Dual-Channel (up to 64GB) DDR4 4800MHz+" on the specs. If they did a good enough job testing all sorts of memory up to that point and everything works great, than I don't see an issue with it. If there are 25 kits in the world that run 4800MHz and only 1 of them is compatible...yeah...no good. I think the execution is the important part and we can only wait to see how that goes.


When you eliminate standards, which is what a QVL is, they have a way of eroding. Depending upon 'testing random memory sticks' and putty a happy face 'everything works great' seems ad hoc and unprofessional. There is the point though, that QVL's become less useful (for memory) unless frequently updated after a board is released. Interestingly enough I was 5 seconds away from pulling the trigger on  that same memory, 32GB, on my X99 to 'upgrade' from my Dominator C16 3200. Decided it just wasn't worth it. Waiting for the release of the 3080 Ti.
2021/03/29 15:30:58
B0baganoosh
ty_ger07
Nike_7688
ty_ger07
Nike_7688
"You should be fine with those :) Actually going forward the QVL memory lists will be retired, no real known compatibility issues with memory that falls under spec."

That's a pretty lazy approach. The purpose of QVL is to verify that the memory works and so that the motherboard manufacturer has a chance to work with the memory and optimize the board's sub-timings. If the QVL is retired, memory compatibility could suffer and memory performance could suffer.



It depends on how they do it, really.
 
For example, if you look at the z490, it says "Memory Support – 2 DIMM Dual-Channel (up to 64GB) DDR4 4800MHz+" on the specs. If they did a good enough job testing all sorts of memory up to that point and everything works great, than I don't see an issue with it. If there are 25 kits in the world that run 4800MHz and only 1 of them is compatible...yeah...no good. I think the execution is the important part and we can only wait to see how that goes.


What does that have to do with testing, validating, and optimizing board sub-timings?

Literally everything. If they test and validate a wide enough range of memory, do they really need to call out specific skus? What happens if a year after they put out a qvl, there are 100 new skus out there. Should they test all of them? Where/when does it end? I'm not even saying you're entirely wrong (or even wrong at all) with your concerns, I'm just saying if they're thorough enough, I don't care if there's a specific list of narrowed down parts when many others will work just as well.
2021/03/29 17:36:13
HeavyHemi
Nike_7688
ty_ger07
Nike_7688
ty_ger07
Nike_7688
"You should be fine with those :) Actually going forward the QVL memory lists will be retired, no real known compatibility issues with memory that falls under spec."

That's a pretty lazy approach. The purpose of QVL is to verify that the memory works and so that the motherboard manufacturer has a chance to work with the memory and optimize the board's sub-timings. If the QVL is retired, memory compatibility could suffer and memory performance could suffer.



It depends on how they do it, really.
 
For example, if you look at the z490, it says "Memory Support – 2 DIMM Dual-Channel (up to 64GB) DDR4 4800MHz+" on the specs. If they did a good enough job testing all sorts of memory up to that point and everything works great, than I don't see an issue with it. If there are 25 kits in the world that run 4800MHz and only 1 of them is compatible...yeah...no good. I think the execution is the important part and we can only wait to see how that goes.


What does that have to do with testing, validating, and optimizing board sub-timings?

Literally everything. If they test and validate a wide enough range of memory, do they really need to call out specific skus? What happens if a year after they put out a qvl, there are 100 new skus out there. Should they test all of them? Where/when does it end? I'm not even saying you're entirely wrong (or even wrong at all) with your concerns, I'm just saying if they're thorough enough, I don't care if there's a specific list of narrowed down parts when many others will work just as well.

"You should be fine with those :) Actually going forward the QVL memory lists will be retired, no real known compatibility issues with memory that falls under spec."
 
Marketing... I wonder if the engineering dept cleared that.

Okay, but you're literally arguing going forward, they do not need to do this. Of course, they literally do need to test compatibility for new memory and new boards as they are released. The issue is how long should one expect a manufacturer to maintain a QVL,  and how extensive should it be. Some of the top end board makers use the QVL as a selling point.
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