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AnsweredWhat is EVGA policy regarding Liquid Metal thermal interface material?

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Halfdead14
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2021/09/14 01:36:13 (permalink)
Does the use of this material void the warranty if used without damaging anything in the process?
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rjohnson11
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Re: What is EVGA policy regarding Liquid Metal thermal interface material? 2021/09/14 02:28:38 (permalink)
To be quite honest I don't know what the policy is concerning this so I'll forward this to EVGA. However I personally would never use Liquid Metal. 

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EVGATech_AdamB
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Re: What is EVGA policy regarding Liquid Metal thermal interface material? 2021/09/14 14:26:53 (permalink) ☼ Best Answerby Cool GTX 2021/09/14 16:16:52
Yes, unfortunately the use of liquid metal will inevitably end up voiding the warranty as typically it will instantly short the resistors surrounding the GPU die. Usually, what people will do to prevent this is to put a clear nail polish around the GPU die to try to protect it, but the use of nail polish on the card would void the warranty. Also, since liquid metal can eat away at both the cooler and the GPU die that would be considered physical damage to the card. In general, we strongly DO NOT recommend using any liquid metal on the card.

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austin86
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Re: What is EVGA policy regarding Liquid Metal thermal interface material? 2021/09/14 15:49:41 (permalink)
EVGATech_AdamB
Yes, unfortunately the use of liquid metal will inevitably end up voiding the warranty as typically it will instantly short the resistors surrounding the GPU die. Usually, what people will do to prevent this is to put a clear nail polish around the GPU die to try to protect it, but the use of nail polish on the card would void the warranty. Also, since liquid metal can eat away at both the cooler and the GPU die that would be considered physical damage to the card. In general, we strongly DO NOT recommend using any liquid metal on the card.

This is somewhat misleading. liquid metal will not magically short out SMD capacitors around the core. The only way the caps would short out is if one uses way to much of it and it seeps out or they spill it. True it can eat the heatsink, but only its its made of aluminum or a aluminum containing alloy and will only eat the die if used with a aluminum or a aluminum containing alloy heatsink.

This is coming from someone thats used liquid metal for years. Had it in my 3 GTX 285s for almost 10 years and not a problem, my cor2duo from the same system too, my sandy bridge laptop since I got it new and many other systems belonging to clients.
Cleaning it off can be a pain and if one worried about it seeping out you can use anti static tape around the die, the kind you see on laptop CPUs. Definitely don’t use glue or clear finger nail polish.

That being said despite what I stated I don’t normally recommend using it. Its not like regular compound and has a lot higher set of risk factors when using. For instance if your copper heatsink has a small aluminum alloy it will eat the heatsink like Adam stated. Sadly most would not know if the cards heatsink has a aluminum alloy. Using the right amount can also be challenging, its very easy to use to much or to little unlike nominal compound. Cleaning a card/heatsink that had it installed can be time consuming. Not to mention if you spill any of the PCB you will be in a world of pain cleaning it up.

Ask yourself, is killing the card and risking losing its warranty worth a few C lower temps?
Under most circumstances I’d say no its not worth it.
post edited by austin86 - 2021/09/14 15:52:21
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ty_ger07
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Re: What is EVGA policy regarding Liquid Metal thermal interface material? 2021/09/14 21:05:08 (permalink)
austin86
Cleaning it off can be a pain ...

The staining cannot be removed without removing some metal off the surface of the heatsink.  The staining is effectively a plating.  So, as far as the warranty is concerned, it is impossible to return the heatsink to its stock form if the stock heatsink has been in contact with liquid metal.
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austin86
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Re: What is EVGA policy regarding Liquid Metal thermal interface material? 2021/09/16 06:13:00 (permalink)
ty_ger07
austin86
Cleaning it off can be a pain ...

The staining cannot be removed without removing some metal off the surface of the heatsink.  The staining is effectively a plating.  So, as far as the warranty is concerned, it is impossible to return the heatsink to its stock form if the stock heatsink has been in contact with liquid metal.


It can be removed, if you heat up the liquid mettle it returns to a liquid state and you can scrub/pick it off. You're then left with a darken tinted surface witch will take some good scrubbing with a rubbing alcohol wipe or pencil eraser, It takes a lot of time but can be done. I still don't recommend it for a card still under warranty, 3-5c is not worth it for the cost of cards these days. Not to mention the trouble one will go though to clean the card up.
 
EDIT:
I should realy make a good detailed video or thread on its ins and outs and how to use it correctly. 
 
post edited by austin86 - 2021/09/16 06:16:59
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Re: What is EVGA policy regarding Liquid Metal thermal interface material? 2021/09/16 08:20:10 (permalink)
I would only ever use an approved material that wouldn’t void the warranty. Stock is pretty good normally but getting a good replacement if you are to replace can help but I would want the warranty since after three years I probably would be looking to upgrade the card anyway so I don’t see a point of changing it out when I don’t have a warranty anymore since the improvement to overclocking won’t really amount to that much in games that the card wasn’t already doing great on.

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