EVGA

AnsweredHot!LLc and VDroop?

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kelkel1
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2019/12/06 14:16:04 (permalink)
Other manufacturers use LLC, evga uses VDroop.
 
What is the difference?
 
Is there a direct correlation between LLC settings and VDroop settings? For example; would a VDroop setting of +25% = a LLC5 (or another number) setting?

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bob16314
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Re: LLc and VDroop? 2019/12/06 23:52:00 (permalink) ☼ Best Answerby Cool GTX 2019/12/09 07:35:54
The difference is just in the name, that's all.
 
The higher the Vdroop the more the CPU voltage drops/droops, most noticeably under load.
 
LLC/Vdroop is the setting that keeps the CPU from overshooting (spiking) the processor manufacturer's voltage spec when it transitions from load to no load/low load.
 
On my board, the higher the LLC number (1 thru 7, not in %), the less Vdroop it has and the higher the Vcore under load..Other boards can work differently on a percentage and not a number..You should test it and see how it acts on your board.
 
 
 
 

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kelkel1
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Re: LLc and VDroop? 2019/12/07 05:28:21 (permalink)
bob16314
The difference is just in the name, that's all.

The higher the Vdroop the more the CPU voltage drops/droops, most noticeably under load.

LLC/Vdroop is the setting that keeps the CPU from overshooting (spiking) the processor manufacturer's voltage spec when it transitions from load to no load/low load.

On my board, the higher the LLC number (1 thru 7, not in %), the less Vdroop it has and the higher the Vcore under load..Other boards can work differently on a percentage and not a number..You should test it and see how it acts on your board.







Thanks.
 
I see a lot of people who use, for example, Asus boards mentioning LLC 5 and LLC 7.
 
Does anyone know what those equate to on the evga boards?

Z390 DARK, 9900K, 2080 FTW3 ULTRA, GSKILL 4500, 960EVO M.2
https://valid.x86.fr/52sqs5
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Kylearan
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Re: LLc and VDroop? 2019/12/08 23:22:27 (permalink)
kelkel1
bob16314
The difference is just in the name, that's all.

The higher the Vdroop the more the CPU voltage drops/droops, most noticeably under load.

LLC/Vdroop is the setting that keeps the CPU from overshooting (spiking) the processor manufacturer's voltage spec when it transitions from load to no load/low load.

On my board, the higher the LLC number (1 thru 7, not in %), the less Vdroop it has and the higher the Vcore under load..Other boards can work differently on a percentage and not a number..You should test it and see how it acts on your board.







Thanks.
 
I see a lot of people who use, for example, Asus boards mentioning LLC 5 and LLC 7.
 
Does anyone know what those equate to on the evga boards?




LLC5 (Asus), LLC High (Gigabyte) is equal to 50% reduced vdroop (0.8 mOhms as Intel spec is 1.6 mOhms) on 8 core CFL.
LLC6 (Asus), LLC Turbo (Gigabyte) is equal to 75% reduced vdroop (0.4 mOhms) on 8 core CFL
 
https://www.overclock.net/forum/6-intel-motherboards/1638955-z370-z390-vrm-discussion-thread-398.html#post27860326
 
One thing no one tells you is the relationship between reduced vdroop and worsened transients.
Buildzoid did a very good video "Probinator" showing how loadline calibration affects transients on the Dark and other boards.  You can youtube that.
Elmor did an Oscilloscope graph on the Asus (maximus XI Gene)
 
https://elmorlabs.com/index.php/2019-09-05/vrm-load-line-visualized/
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kelkel1
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Re: LLc and VDroop? 2019/12/09 13:30:31 (permalink)
Kylearan
kelkel1
bob16314
The difference is just in the name, that's all.

The higher the Vdroop the more the CPU voltage drops/droops, most noticeably under load.

LLC/Vdroop is the setting that keeps the CPU from overshooting (spiking) the processor manufacturer's voltage spec when it transitions from load to no load/low load.

On my board, the higher the LLC number (1 thru 7, not in %), the less Vdroop it has and the higher the Vcore under load..Other boards can work differently on a percentage and not a number..You should test it and see how it acts on your board.







Thanks.
 
I see a lot of people who use, for example, Asus boards mentioning LLC 5 and LLC 7.
 
Does anyone know what those equate to on the evga boards?




LLC5 (Asus), LLC High (Gigabyte) is equal to 50% reduced vdroop (0.8 mOhms as Intel spec is 1.6 mOhms) on 8 core CFL.
LLC6 (Asus), LLC Turbo (Gigabyte) is equal to 75% reduced vdroop (0.4 mOhms) on 8 core CFL
 
https://www.overclock.net/forum/6-intel-motherboards/1638955-z370-z390-vrm-discussion-thread-398.html#post27860326
 
One thing no one tells you is the relationship between reduced vdroop and worsened transients.
Buildzoid did a very good video "Probinator" showing how loadline calibration affects transients on the Dark and other boards.  You can youtube that.
Elmor did an Oscilloscope graph on the Asus (maximus XI Gene)
 
https://elmorlabs.com/index.php/2019-09-05/vrm-load-line-visualized/




Thanks, then +25% (more VDroop) would be LLC4 or LLC3?
 
I find that my best overclocking results use +25%, since the Dark tends to seriously overvolt.

Z390 DARK, 9900K, 2080 FTW3 ULTRA, GSKILL 4500, 960EVO M.2
https://valid.x86.fr/52sqs5
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