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Hot!Anyone seen the Go Chiller fluid with graphene nano particles?

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bavor
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2021/09/01 13:48:22 (permalink)
https://gochiller.com/
 
They claim much better heat transfer than pure water and traditional water-cooling fluids.  I saw the LTT video, but I don't completely trust their testing methods to be reliable and accurate.

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    Flint 1760
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    Re: Anyone seen the Go Chiller fluid with graphene nano particles? 2021/09/01 15:47:55 (permalink)
    I don't know about their claims of @6-7C decrease without varied independent testing.  I do know, that for me, the only thing that goes in my loops is clear, these days Mayhems X1 clear, no dyes ever, a lesson learned many years ago.


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    wmmills
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    Re: Anyone seen the Go Chiller fluid with graphene nano particles? 2021/09/02 06:57:09 (permalink)
    bavor
    https://gochiller.com/
     
    They claim much better heat transfer than pure water and traditional water-cooling fluids.  I saw the LTT video, but I don't completely trust their testing methods to be reliable and accurate.


    +1.... same here. I saw it too and it MAY give you a decent drop but god forbid you even have a small leak, its all going to be toast. Graphene conducts better than copper and imo 6c, at best, just aint worth it. Id also like to the results of a longevity test with it too just to see if those claims hold up at all. With the huge range of products you could put this stuff in i have a feeling only large micro channeled blocks and hearty pumps will survive this stuff.  

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    the_Scarlet_one
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    Re: Anyone seen the Go Chiller fluid with graphene nano particles? 2021/09/02 09:33:38 (permalink)
    Yes, LTT’s channel did a whole video on this, and guess what, they posted a whole video about it.


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    ty_ger07
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    Re: Anyone seen the Go Chiller fluid with graphene nano particles? 2021/09/03 06:37:27 (permalink)
    the_Scarlet_one
    Yes, LTT’s channel did a whole video on this, and guess what, they posted a whole video about it.

    Any video/review from anyone other than LTT?
    I don't watch LTT infomercials. Last thing I want is for YouTube's algorithm to think it should be serving me that sort of content.
    post edited by ty_ger07 - 2021/09/03 06:40:35
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    the_Scarlet_one
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    Re: Anyone seen the Go Chiller fluid with graphene nano particles? 2021/09/03 07:12:59 (permalink)
    You can watch it in an incognito browser if you don’t want an algorithm figuring out you watched it. I watched it and can comfortably say, there was no crazy temp differences. They literally say 1-2 degrees difference versus distilled water, which is neglible when you pay $27 for one liter of this solution versus 1.00 for a Gallon of distilled water.

    As far as chasing rabbits to get others answers, nope, too busy for that. Google would be my suggestion or messaging your trusted reviewers and asking them for info on such products.

    I would assume, just like every single other particulate based fluid on the planet, this would risk clogging the loop over time.
    post edited by the_Scarlet_one - 2021/09/03 07:27:51

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    bavor
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    Re: Anyone seen the Go Chiller fluid with graphene nano particles? 2021/09/04 13:44:02 (permalink)
    the_Scarlet_one
    Yes, LTT’s channel did a whole video on this, and guess what, they posted a whole video about it.





    I mentioned the LTT video in my original post.  I just didn't link it because  I don't trust their testing methods.
     
    the_Scarlet_one
    I would assume, just like every single other particulate based fluid on the planet, this would risk clogging the loop over time.



    They claim that the particles are smaller than 1 micron.  I thought the particles in the cloudy, opaque, and color shifting fluids were much bigger than that.

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    the_Scarlet_one
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    Re: Anyone seen the Go Chiller fluid with graphene nano particles? 2021/09/04 14:30:26 (permalink)
    What is there not to trust in their testing methodology? Please explain what you would trust about testing one fluid in a setup and then a different fluid in the same setup?

    Clogs don’t just happen strictly based on particle size, clogs happen because the particles get stuck together and clog the system. Unfortunately there is no long terms testing that has occurred, as far as I can tell, to rule out clogging just like every other fluid that is particle based.

    Go chiller claims that they use anti foaming agents, and the video shows that the foaming was annoying during the testing, so that doesn’t do much to instill confidence in the fluid. I have only had very minor issues with foaming in all of the particle based fluids I have run, and it was very very easy to turn the system off, wait for the bubbles to settle for 1-2 minutes, and then continue on.
    post edited by the_Scarlet_one - 2021/09/04 14:32:36

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    bavor
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    Re: Anyone seen the Go Chiller fluid with graphene nano particles? 2021/09/10 23:38:36 (permalink)
    the_Scarlet_one
    What is there not to trust in their testing methodology? Please explain what you would trust about testing one fluid in a setup and then a different fluid in the same setup?

     
    The whole group at LTT has a history of not being the most accurate/repeatable/scientific with various hardware testing in the past.  
     
    There were temperature fluctuations in the rooms and they weren't comparing ambient temperature through the entire test to the hardware temperatures, just at the start and end.  How do we know if the temperature was actually consistent through the entire test?  How long were the tests done under the changing conditions?
     
    The logs for the 2nd test showed the CPU temperature did not stabilize and was still slowly climbing when testing with water.   In the video where they show the graph of the data, the CPU temp with the water in the loop was 74C, then went up to 75C, then went up to 76C near the end, then the test was stopped with the CPU temperature when using water was still increasing.  When they switched to the data file from the other run of testing with water as the coolant, it showed the same thing, the CPU temperature was still increasing when they stopped the other test using water.  We don't know what the actual peak temperature would have been because the temperature didn't appear to stabilize.  The temperature with the Go Chiller fluid seemed to be stabilized and was fluctuating up and down 1 degree between 70C and 71C based on what they showed of the data in the graph. 
     
    It seems that they didn't look very closely or do any actual calculations about average temperature difference or temperature difference at the end of the test.  If the CPU temperature with the Go Chiller fluid was stable going in between 70C and 71C and the CPU temperature with the water was at 76C and still climbing, then the difference was more than the "only 1 or 2 degrees difference" they stated.  Then they later stated 3 or 4 degrees at another point when looking at the results of the 2nd test.  So which is it, 1 or 2 degrees or 3 or 4 degrees?  Their data on the screen shows a difference of at least 5 degrees(71C vs 76C and climbing) when comparing CPU temperature to CPU temperature.  
     
    That's why I don't completely trust their testing methods.  They didn't seem that precise and reliable and they didn't really take much time to interpret the data or make sure the CPU temperature stabilized with the testing while using water.
     
    the_Scarlet_one
    Clogs don’t just happen strictly based on particle size, clogs happen because the particles get stuck together and clog the system. Unfortunately there is no long terms testing that has occurred, as far as I can tell, to rule out clogging just like every other fluid that is particle based.

     
    From the little bit of data about other pastel fluids I could find, it seems that their particle size is larger than the particles in the go chiller fluid.  Also, some of the documentation seems to imply that graphene in small particles acts as a lubricant.  So I wonder if its lubrication properties would make it less likely to clog.  
     
    the_Scarlet_one
    Go chiller claims that they use anti foaming agents, and the video shows that the foaming was annoying during the testing, so that doesn’t do much to instill confidence in the fluid. I have only had very minor issues with foaming in all of the particle based fluids I have run, and it was very very easy to turn the system off, wait for the bubbles to settle for 1-2 minutes, and then continue on.



    From what I read about the chemicals and surfactants used with graphene suspended in fluid make it much more likely to foam than traditional water cooling fluids.  That's why it needed an anti foaming agent and was still foaming/making bubbles.  There is more technical literature about graphene particles in fluids used in other industries, but some of what I found is behind a paywall.
     
    The more I read about graphene used in industrial applications, the more I think that radiator fins coated with graphene might be a better use of it in PC cooling.  There were a few articles that mentioned graphene coating on the coil of air conditioners increased the efficiency of air conditioner systems.

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    BiOD0L3
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    Re: Anyone seen the Go Chiller fluid with graphene nano particles? 2021/09/13 18:39:13 (permalink)
    Hmm...1-2C would actually be worthwhile especially in extreme OC setups.
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    bavor
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    Re: Anyone seen the Go Chiller fluid with graphene nano particles? 2021/09/14 19:17:18 (permalink)
    Shortly after the original post, I sent the company an email with some technical questions.  They offered to send me a free sample and asked how much I need for my loop and the external cooling setup I use for benchmarking.  Four liters of the fluid arrived today.  I'm going to do a comparison of DI water and the Go Chiller fluid in several situations with different hardware combinations and both ambient and below ambient cooling.
     


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